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Posts tagged "Disability Discrimination"

Reasonable accommodations for executive dysfunction

"Executive dysfunctions" come in all shapes and sizes -- and they can be caused by many different conditions like attention-deficient hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism. But you don't have to be born with executive function deficits to have them. Many people develop problems with executive functions due to things like brain injuries, strokes, lupus, multiple sclerosis and other chronic health conditions.

Can you take a support animal to work with you?

Once upon a time, the only support animals being used by the disabled were "seeing eye dogs." Today, however, support animals are used to assist everyone from diabetics and those with seizure disorders to people suffering from mental and emotional conditions like anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Could you be discriminated against due to your service animal?

There is a lot of controversy surrounding the use of service animals by some disabled people. Part of the problem is because so many nondisabled individuals try to pass off their pets as service animals or emotional support dogs. They make life harder for the truly disabled folks who need their service dogs to lead normal lives.

What sort of work accommodations can be made for migraines?

If you've ever had a genuine migraine, there's little chance you'll confuse it with an ordinary tension headache. Migraines can be utterly debilitating -- and an estimated 4 million adults in the United States suffer from a chronic form that affects them 15 days or more out of every month.

Court rules accidental discrimination is still discrimination

A California Court of Appeals' decision regarding a wrongful termination claim and disability discrimination has a warning for employers: Be cautious when you apply a termination policy to a newly disabled employee. You'd better be certain that you've done everything necessary to make reasonable accommodations for the disability and that you're not making an error in the application of your policy. If you do make an error, you -- not the employee -- will bear the financial consequences.